Good dedicated rip blade?

Status
Not open for further replies.

decibel

Patrick
Corporate Member
Looking for some advice on a rip blade. I currently use the Forrest WWII and
Love it. I make end grin cutting boards from time to time and usually just leave in the Forrest and it's fine. Last week I was matching out several
And decided to switch to my Freud rip blade from home depot. It did cut faster (as my contractor saw
Doesn't like ripping 8/4 hard maple) the results while less burning required me to clean up cuts on jointer where I didn't have to with he Forrest.

Sooo what's a good glue line rip blade? The Freud lm74/75 are there others you recommend ? Or should I just stick with the WWII and tell my saw to man up :)
 

timf67

New User
Tim
I use a Freud F410 on my 1.75 hp tablesaw for glueline rips in 8/4 hard maple and it works well with minor burning. Mine is several years old, so I don't know if they are still available.
 

Bryan S

Bryan
Corporate Member
The Freud glue line ripping blades are only recommended at cutting materials up to 1 in thick, although I am sure our resident Freud rep will weigh in. You are going to find that several here will recommend the Freud 24 tooth heavy duty ripping blades. like this one or this one. I wish I had picked one up when Woodcraft had their 20% off bag sale a few weeks ago. :BangHead:
 

golfdad

Co-director of Outreach
Dirk
Corporate Member
From what I've seen and read my next blade will be the Fushion from Freud....
 

Tim Sherwood

Tim
Corporate Member
I recommend a thin kerf blade for a contractors saw. It really reduces the load on the motor.
You'll cut heavier wood and reduce overheating the blade.
 

JimD

Jim
Senior User
For minimum power you want flat top teeth, not many of them, and deep gullets to clear sawdust. A freud 24 tooth rip blade is the best I've used for minimizing power consumption. I use a Ryobi BT3100 with a 15A universal motor and have ripped 3 1/2 inch hardwood with it. I have both a thin and a regular kerf. I think the thin cuts a little easier but I don't believe the difference is a lot. The grind and number of teeth make more difference IMHO. You also need a sharp blade free of resin. When I will make deep rips, I often clean the blade first. Thin versus thick would depend on which is sharper. With a clean, sharp blade, my little Ryobi will cut really thick hardwood surprisingly easily.

Jim
 

KenOfCary

Board of Directors, Secretary
Ken
Staff member
Corporate Member
I just used a brand new Freud LM72R010 (the red one mentioned above) to rip some 12/4 Hard Maple and it did an excellent job. No burning and it left a very smooth surface. But I have a SawStop PCS with 3HP motor. It works much better than the combination CrossCut and Rip blade that came with the saw. The combo blade is ok at both functions but not excellent at either.

- Ken.
 

kooshball

David
Corporate Member
Because of the thickness limit on the "glue line rip" blades from Freud I went with their 24 tooth heavy duty rip blade and love it. you can really hear and feel the difference as the load on the motor is reduced vs. a WWII.

Maybe this is unnecessary but I never consider any table saw cut a glue line (too many feed variables). So I always go back to the jointer if only for a very light pass to prep the two surfaces to be glued.
 

GeorgeM

New User
George
I use a DeWalt DW7124TK blade as well as a Delta 35-7642FK blade. Either gives a nice clean rip. Both blades were bought on sale for less than $25.00 each.

I can feel good about recommending either blade.

Have a Blessed day.
George
 

Tim Sherwood

Tim
Corporate Member
I will agree that the blade that comes with the Sawstop is not the best quality. I just finished putting my saw into action. I quickly changed back to an old combo blade I had. You would think that a top quality saw maker would want you to get a top quality cut. I did read in the instructions that Sawstop cautions against using any coated blade, even clear ones. It could interfere with their contact sensor.
 
T

toolferone

I did read in the instructions that Sawstop cautions against using any coated blade, even clear ones. It could interfere with their contact sensor.
Just a quick FYI. After talking with many Sawstop reps the last 2 years, they all say it is a blade were the teeth are coated that is the real problem. That being said. The Freud blades do not coat the teeth and also the coating on our blades is a metal based so it conducts electricity.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Our Sponsors

LATEST FOR SALE LISTINGS

Top