Edge gluing

Several years ago I saw an article that explained if you ran two boards at the same time on edge thru the jointer they would match perfect on the edge when gluing together. I guess that was because a jointer can be off a small amount off even when the fence is square.

What I don't remember is how to orient the boards when you are going to join.
 

mpholway

Matt
Corporate Member
They need to be reversed. The face that is against the fence needs to be down for one board and up for the other.
 
They need to be reversed. The face that is against the fence needs to be down for one board and up for the other.
Not sure I understand.
I meant the two edges I’m running thru joiner at the same time will be the two edges glued together. Just not sure how to turn the edges. Like book pages or sides reversed.
 

AllanD

Allan
Senior User
Running them like that will correct the problem when the fence is not exactly at 90 degrees to the blades. The jointed edges will not be at 90 to the faces but will match together when opened like a book.
It will not correct an error of the jointed edge not being straight. For instance if there is snipe or the infeed table is not parallel with outfeed table or any other way that the edge is curved.
 

enobles

New User
Earl
Lay the boards out face up next to each other without gluing. Working in one direction, at each joint label one board in and the other out. Do this in progression across the face of all boards at all joints alternating the in and out. When you put the boards on the jointer the word in means that face in towards the fence. The word out means facing out away from the fence.

If the fence isn't and most likely not perfectly square to the table bed, you have alternating angles that square up to eliminate any error. You get flat surfaces no matter the angle of error.

I do the same when using my table saw to join boards. I use the words up and down. One edge gets thru the table saw with the face down and the mating edge of the other board gets cut with the face up.
 
Lay the boards out face up next to each other without gluing. Working in one direction, at each joint label one board in and the other out. Do this in progression across the face of all boards at all joints alternating the in and out. When you put the boards on the jointer the word in means that face in towards the fence. The word out means facing out away from the fence.

If the fence isn't and most likely not perfectly square to the table bed, you have alternating angles that square up to eliminate any error. You get flat surfaces no matter the angle of error.

I do the same when using my table saw to join boards. I use the words up and down. One edge gets thru the table saw with the face down and the mating edge of the other board gets cut with the face up.
 

Willemjm

Willem
Corporate Member
I have never needed to run two boards together.

Never had a problem glueing up directly from the jointer.

I think that is over complicating things, just set up the jointer properly. When I purchased my jointer and had it set up, I jointed two 72” long boards and placed the edges together. I had to tweak the outfeed table height a bit until the edges matched up perfectly. That was 15 years ago, never had to make adjustments since.
 

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