Carving a rifle stock

danmart77

Dan
Corporate Member
Here is the side of the stock called the cheek piece. This is the wood before carving.
1-22 Mar 2018 022.JPG


In most cases in the 18th century, carvings were from ideas that builders saw in nature. In this case I chose to carve a floor stem and petals. The hardest part of carving a gunstock is working on a curved surface and holding the wood steady. I am hoping to make a giant leap in this area after building a vise with another member in June.
left handed half stock 003.JPG


This is the patchox on the rifle. It is a "pierced box with openings in the brass. This was a difficult patchbox to cut from an old door kick plate. The dark spots on the brass is from annealing it to a curved shape.
More info on inletting brass in the wood at:
left handed half stock 007.JPG


I wanted to pour some pewter around the nose cap/entry pipe area. Fist step is to carve out the excavation for the pewter to flow on to the stock.
1-pewter rifle muzzle fill may 19 003.JPG


The process is very touchy -- you make a form around the area with a piece of cardboard and then you pour your pewter in the form
1-pewter rifle muzzle fill may 19 004.JPG

It looks very messy and its something you have to practice pouring at the right temperature or you can burn the edge of the wood.
1-pewter rifle muzzle fill may 19 005.JPG


After filing the rough poured pewter this is what you have.

left handed half stock 004.JPG

Carving and embellishing rifle stocks has lots of transferable skill for the furniture maker
IMG_1010.jpg
 

creasman

Board of Directors, Development Director
Jim
Staff member
Corporate Member
Super nice, Dan. Can't wait to see the final results. I don't see how the pewter doesn't burn the wood. I guess since the melting point is around 300-400 degrees it cools quick enough to avoid burning?
 

dancam

Dan
Corporate Member
Hey Dan, Absolutely beautiful. Please post more pics as you continue on this piece .
 

Claus

Claus
User
My brother does a lot of carving both in wood and stone. He uses sandbags to “cradle” and stabilize odd shaped pieces while he’s carving.
 

nworegonman

New User
Nick
Hi, I am interested in pouring pewter in a stock I am working on. Some questions: Did you measure the temp of the pewter? Where did you get your material? Any does or don't that you can share? Thanks much.
 

JNCarr

Joe
Corporate Member
That is awesome work. From the carvings to the brass work to the pewter --- very nice.
The pewter gives me some ideas for some of my clocks! As Nick is, I'm interested to learn more.
 

Hmerkle

Hank
Corporate Member
That is awesome work. From the carvings to the brass work to the pewter --- very nice.
The pewter gives me some ideas for some of my clocks! As Nick is, I'm interested to learn more.
Yes, if you can spend some time one-on-one with Dan, you will walk away smarter!
 

drw

Donn
Corporate Member
Dan, you are a true craftsman and your craftsmanship covers a broad range of crafts: furniture making, boat building, gunsmithing, etc., etc! Thank you for sharing.
 

Hjanes

Harlan
User
Really fine work. Showing my ignorance, how does the pewter adhere to the wood surface? Do you apply glue before pouring into the "mold" or is some other process at work? Please keep us informed of progress and final result.
 

JimD

Jim
Senior User
LOOKS GREAT. I've made a new forestock for my double barrel and a complete stock for my 22 lr. But I lack the talent or the patience for even checkering them. I checkered half the fore stock for an old single barrel 20 gauge and quit. It was just too tedious for me. So I really admire people who have the patience and the skill to do this work.
 

smallboat

smallboat
Corporate Member
Here is the side of the stock called the cheek piece. This is the wood before carving.
View attachment 200747

In most cases in the 18th century, carvings were from ideas that builders saw in nature. In this case I chose to carve a floor stem and petals. The hardest part of carving a gunstock is working on a curved surface and holding the wood steady. I am hoping to make a giant leap in this area after building a vise with another member in June.
View attachment 200753

This is the patchox on the rifle. It is a "pierced box with openings in the brass. This was a difficult patchbox to cut from an old door kick plate. The dark spots on the brass is from annealing it to a curved shape.
More info on inletting brass in the wood at:
View attachment 200748

I wanted to pour some pewter around the nose cap/entry pipe area. Fist step is to carve out the excavation for the pewter to flow on to the stock.
View attachment 200750

The process is very touchy -- you make a form around the area with a piece of cardboard and then you pour your pewter in the form
View attachment 200751
It looks very messy and its something you have to practice pouring at the right temperature or you can burn the edge of the wood.
View attachment 200752

After filing the rough poured pewter this is what you have.

View attachment 200754
Carving and embellishing rifle stocks has lots of transferable skill for the furniture maker
View attachment 200756
Quick question- when you are finishing the pewter, how do you keep the fine metal from being embedded in the surrounding wood. I’ve been experimenting with this and like it, but every time I get to fine sanding, I have this issue.
 

danmart77

Dan
Corporate Member
First point of order here- I forgot to post a photo of the pewter excavation with the hold down holes drilled. Pewter is a very soft material and you can get it to flow nicely - but you only get one pour and its done. Having said that the first question is how do you know its not too hot? Just like the old timers did. Heat it up and then let it cool again to a solid state. Then you bring is back to a liquid and pour it. Another reader asked about my sources that I use to get the pewter: Track of the Wolf gun supplies.
 

danmart77

Dan
Corporate Member
pewter pour 002.JPG


Here is a picture of the pewter pour from the barrel channel. Notice the small heads of the sprews? They hold the pour on the wood. There is no glue here in the process. There are other "roots in the pour to help the pewter to stay put.
 

smallboat

smallboat
Corporate Member
Dan- don’t know if you intended those last two posts in answer to my question. If so, I’m sorry I didn’t make it clearer. My question is about the pewter “dust” from filing or sanding. Seems when it gets fine enough it wants to burrow into the grain of the wood (cherry in my case). Should I seal the wood before I start to work the pewter?
Thanks!
 

Hjanes

Harlan
User
View attachment 206933

Here is a picture of the pewter pour from the barrel channel. Notice the small heads of the sprews? They hold the pour on the wood. There is no glue here in the process. There are other "roots in the pour to help the pewter to stay put.
Thanks for the info on "hold down holes". Simple. I look forward to the final views.
 

Our Sponsors

LATEST FOR SALE LISTINGS

Top