Bunch of furniture wood for sale in Galax

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pviser

New User
paul
I bought a 1200 board-foot bundle of ash through IRS auctions (not the Internal Revenue Service) about 6 months ago. Shipping required a flat bed truck which wasn't cheap, but still the cost was minimal overall. As for the current Galax auction, much of the wood appears to have been stored outside and that is of some concern. Even so, I've put in my bid. It's worth a look.
 

sawman101

Bruce Swanson
Corporate Member
I'm interested in obtaining maple, walnut, and sapele, but in quantities of 2-300 bft. I prefer 8/4 so I can resaw as I use a lot of 1/4" stock.
 

Woodman2k

New User
Greg Bender
That auction has a ton of interesting lumber but as pviser mentioned it is all outside. I tryed to find the place on Google Earth but for some reason it does not have street level maps / pictures of that area of Galax. I'm guessing it is on the east side of town on appropriately named T G Vaughn Street.They are not out of business so I'd be interested in why the 250,000 bd ft liquidation.
Greg
 

ScottM

Scott
Staff member
Corporate Member
I am always game for getting in on a deals involving 100 BF or less
 

Willemjm

Willem
Corporate Member
Anybody want to partner on a lot?
I would be in, but we would have to meet over there to inspect. If others are interested, post here and we can arrange a trip there, agree maximum bids and which lots.

The one in Hickory looks as if the lumber is in better condition.
 

srhardwoods

Chris
Senior User
Definitely go inspect. I've bought one load of lumber without inspecting it, through IRS. it wasn't what they said it was. it was listed as 2,000 bf of 5/4 hickory. which is what I needed. Pictures weren't all that good. I picked it up, 5 hours a way and it wasn't hickory. it was maple. I got a good deal regardless, however I was in the need of 5/4 hickory so I bought something I didn't need.

Also, notice in those listings that it says it has been air dried for several years..."several" (except a few lots, listed as kiln dried) if you go inspect, look closely for any signs of bugs. most likely, out of 250k bf of lumber that has been air drying for several years some bugs have to be there. if you take it back to your shop and store it for a while you could easily introduce bugs into your shop as well.

some wood like maple, after being stick stacked you will get "sticker stain" in the lumber. for those not familiar with that, it's where the small sticks that separate the lumber sit. Maple is best kiln dried right away to keep it's white color. after sitting for a while, the stickers create a dark stain under and above them where laid up against the wood, given it's name "sticker stain"

Look up someone who can kiln dry it for you. .25 cents a board foot is about the going rate give or take a few cents. take it to them to be dried to save yourself a headache. The only true way to get rid of bugs, and the eggs is kiln drying them. any questions please let me know. there are some good deals to find out there on some of these auctions.

Chris
 

rsaucedo

Ras
Senior User
I would be intersted in some of the 5/4 walnut in Galax. I would take as much as 1/4 of the 1400 +/-bundle but I only have a small pickup for transport and they will only load on an open trailer. I live in Belmont, west of Charlotte. anyone with flat trailer in thi area interested?

Is there any concensus on which bundle most folks would want? cherry, walnut, there is a lot of cherry face or better, what is Face or better?
 

srhardwoods

Chris
Senior User
The FAS face yields at least 83% clear face cuttings over the entire surface of the board.
Any clear face cutting will have a minimum dimension of 4” wide x 5’ long, or 3” wide x 7’ long.

Basically, one side will be a higher grade than the other. if it was select and better on both faces, would be worth more.

On Cherry, one side may be loaded with sap, other side nice clear cherry color, or 83% of it. on maple, like our curly maple we sell face and better grade would also include one side nice and white curly sapwood, but the other side might have some brown heart in it.

Chris
 

Willemjm

Willem
Corporate Member
I would be intersted in some of the 5/4 walnut in Galax. I would take as much as 1/4 of the 1400 +/-bundle but I only have a small pickup for transport and they will only load on an open trailer. I live in Belmont, west of Charlotte. anyone with flat trailer in thi area interested?

Is there any concensus on which bundle most folks would want? cherry, walnut, there is a lot of cherry face or better, what is Face or better?
We would have to make arrangements soon, means meeting there and inspecting the lumber, deciding what we want to bid on, arranging a flat bed pickup and a place to unload and load onto our pick-up trucks. Last time I filled up a 12' Uhaul trailer, cost me $30. I would take about 500bf of anything Cherry, Maple, or Walnut.

Post here to see how many interested parties we can get together and lets see if we can pull this off.

Who is in?
 

CDPeters

Master of None
Chris
My $0.02 worth:

FAS (Firsts and Seconds) = highest "grade" - 83 to 100% clear - clear cuttings must be a minimum size of 3" x 7' or 4" x 5'. Select is basically FAS 4" x 6' and larger, and is usually FAS on both wide faces.

F1F(FAS 1 face) - as Chris described, FAS on one face only

No. 1 Common - commonly referred to as "cabinet grade" - 66% of one face up to FAS standard

No. 2 Common - "Economy grade" - 50 - 65% meets minimum requirement for No. 1

This is much simplified, but kinda helps understand grading a little better. Grading is very much subjective and alot is in the eye of the beholder. I think Jeff or maybe Scott posted a link a while back to a comprehensive description of grading practices.

Me - I just go by what my eye tells me :dontknow:. Some of what some people call a "defect" makes for a very nice accent feature in a piece.

C.
 

rsaucedo

Ras
Senior User
I'm in for as much as I can carry. I like walnut and cherry. the walnut bundle they have is kiln dried so that may help with the bug issue some. we can discuss the amount I get later. not sure how much it weighs and what I can carry.
 

clarkne

New User
Norm
I've already got a bid on the second bundle of walnut--it's the one that looks like it was stored near the door, and some of the boards have some water stains on them. At least that's what I can tell from the photos. I'm bidding sight-unseen, so I'm not going to go very high with the bid.

I'd be willing to share this lot with someone (assuming I win it). I live in Boone, and I have a trailer, so I could pick it up and bring it back to Boone. Then someone could pick up what they want at my house? Or some other arrangement?

Someone asked a question about weight. Here's a handy calculator:
http://www.woodweb.com/cgi-bin/calculators/calc.pl?calculator=weight_bd_ft
This lot should weigh somewhere around 3000 lbs, depending on moisture content.

Norm
 

scsmith42

New User
Scott Smith
I inspected this auction today in Hickory (had to be in town for something else and figured that I would stop by and check it out).

Walking through the shop is like walking through a museum - the old iron is in great shape and still has motors on it dating back to the 30's and 40's.

WARNING TO SULLY! WARNING TO SULLY! You would LOVE this shop! :gar-La;

All - Most of the wood is pretty decent; but just about all of the bins are a mixture of various species (with a lot of pine in the mix). Presume that 50% or more of the wood in the bin is a species different than what is listed. It is all stored outdoors but under cover.

Most of the lumber looks dirty on the surface, but it will clean up just fine.

Probably the best deal would be on lot 120, it seemed to have the most lumber (but the shed that it's stored in is a hazard). Lot 108 looked pretty nice too.

I would not be afraid to bid on any of the wood.

Scott
 

sestes

New User
Steve
I'm not far from Hickory, but probably can't get by to inspect, so thanks for the info. How long did most of the boards seem to be?
 

scsmith42

New User
Scott Smith
I'm not far from Hickory, but probably can't get by to inspect, so thanks for the info. How long did most of the boards seem to be?
Average is either 10' or 12' as I recall.

Most of them have a lot of grime on the surface, but when you scratch it off there is some beautiful wood underneath.

One other thing - most IRS auctions take place at large plants, and they are very particular regarding the type of transportation that is used to haul the equipment (in other words, they don't cater to Joe woodworker picking up in his pickup truck or single axle trailer).

This auction is a bit different (older equipment and not one that will attract the large company purchasers), and I think that in this instance there will not be any hassles for individual woodworkers picking up the equipment or wood.
 

sestes

New User
Steve
Has anyone else noticed the stipulation that "non-hand carryable" lots OR use of a "cutting tool" require a $2,000,000 liability policy? Are they saying that if I need to saw some of the boards to fit them in my conveyance, I have to take out an insurance policy?
 

scsmith42

New User
Scott Smith
Has anyone else noticed the stipulation that "non-hand carryable" lots OR use of a "cutting tool" require a $2,000,000 liability policy? Are they saying that if I need to saw some of the boards to fit them in my conveyance, I have to take out an insurance policy?

Steve, that's the standard IRS boilerplate language, and is primarily applicable when you pick up inside a plant and have to use torches or metal cutting equipment to remove the equipment.

I've picked up at several of their auctions and never had to provide a COI.

Plus, the only way that the wood at this auction can be loaded is by hand. The design of *most* of the bins precludes loading with a forklift on all but a few.

Scott
 
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