Bandsaw Part Repair/Replace

Flute Maker

Mike
User
I have a Delta Rockwell 14" bandsaw with a riser kit.It works good for what I use it for.On one of the guides ...piece that slides in and out to guide or keep the blade from moving there is a crack and it makes so you can't tighthen the square metal guide. There is one of both side of the blade (I dont know bandsaw parts lol)

Can I repair this hole/crack or where can I get I get a replacement part? Would it be cheaper or better to upgrade somewhat?? I don’t know a lot about bandsaws .. I would like to spend as little as possible on this . It is Delta Rockwell 28-290...older bandsaw but works good.

Where is the best place to get parts?? Thanks!!!!
 

Attachments

Last edited:

Bill Clemmons

Bill
Corporate Member
My first choice would be to replace it w/ one of the options listed above. But if you really want to go as cheap as possible you might try some JB Weld in the cracks. That might hold for awhile. Be sure to get the formula for metal.
 

marinosr

Richard
Senior User
I can vouch for the eBay seller, wmprice, that Jeff mentioned. I bought the same part from him for my 28-245. he buys the parts for imports saws and then machines them down to Delta specifications. Ereplacementparts might have the part off the shelf though but you need to make sure that the left block holder is milled in a curve like shown in yours, so that the thrust bearing can move over it with clearance.
 
Last edited:

bob vaughan

Bob Vaughan
Senior User
Be careful about ordering those parts. "Import" band saws have the same looking bracket but there's a "gotcha" detail. The slot for adjusting in and out on the back of the bracket is on the opposite side and thus will not work with the USA-made machines.
The steel side guides is the best of all worlds. Roller side guides emboss sawdust on the blade plus the bearings get sawdust in them or have the surrounding sawdust leach the lubricating oil out of the grease and thus wear out faster. I have one band saw with roller guides and I really don't like them but I muddle through. The other saws that I've had with the roller guides were changed to steel block side guides and I'm much happier with them. Non-steel side guides like phule blocks create more friction than steel.

That side guide holding bracket is a commonly broken part and a not very expensive part to boot. Get a bracket that fits the Delta 28-200 and you'll be good. The 28-200 is pretty much a generic stock number for all USA-made Delta wood cutting band saws when it comes to guide and drive parts. Different stock numbers will quantify which wheel cover style parts will be needed, but that's not the issue here.
 

Flute Maker

Mike
User

marinosr

Richard
Senior User
Be careful about ordering those parts. "Import" band saws have the same looking bracket but there's a "gotcha" detail. The slot for adjusting in and out on the back of the bracket is on the opposite side and thus will not work with the USA-made machines.
The steel side guides is the best of all worlds. Roller side guides emboss sawdust on the blade plus the bearings get sawdust in them or have the surrounding sawdust leach the lubricating oil out of the grease and thus wear out faster. I have one band saw with roller guides and I really don't like them but I muddle through. The other saws that I've had with the roller guides were changed to steel block side guides and I'm much happier with them. Non-steel side guides like phule blocks create more friction than steel.

That side guide holding bracket is a commonly broken part and a not very expensive part to boot. Get a bracket that fits the Delta 28-200 and you'll be good. The 28-200 is pretty much a generic stock number for all USA-made Delta wood cutting band saws when it comes to guide and drive parts. Different stock numbers will quantify which wheel cover style parts will be needed, but that's not the issue here.

Very nice looking saw Bob, and wow what a huge motor.

Cool blocks, a.k.a. graphite-impregnated phenolic resin, do have a much lower coefficient of friction than steel (~0.15 vs ~0.5-0.7), so all things being equal, will heat your bandsaw blade substantially less. I wonder why your experience has been different?

Wmprice, the guy on ebay, does sell the guides with the correctly-oriented slot, but it seems ereplacementparts.com has the original in stock anyway for cheaper.
 

bob vaughan

Bob Vaughan
Senior User
Cool blocks, a.k.a. graphite-impregnated phenolic resin, do have a much lower coefficient of friction than steel (~0.15 vs ~0.5-0.7), so all things being equal, will heat your bandsaw blade substantially less. I wonder why your experience has been different?
You just hit the key word: Experience.
Once I got some 1/2" metal cutting blades since they had lots of surface. I got some phule blocks and other plastic side guides that were on the market at the time. I made up a pinch clamp to clamp the guides together against the blade. The 14" bandsaw motor was a 1/2 HP so it would give some good comparative amp readings on the friction differences. I'd install the various blocks, turn on the saw, pinch the blocks against the blade and read the amp meter. I even made up blocks from other materials like various woods and plastics including teflon. All gave about a one amp reading difference except the steel. That barely registered. Teflon wasn't too bad but wore away so quickly as to be considered a non-starter. The other materials wore away some including the black phenolic phule blocks. Besides the friction issue, I quickly observed that the softer material would dent under the set screw pressure thus making it difficult if not impossible to fine-adjust for wear. I did this test because a hobby woodworking magazine asked me too. Turns out that the perpetrator and advertiser of phule blocks and had gotten his nose out of joint because other people were offering competing products. I submitted my findings. The article quickly went to the trash can. I figure their advertising sales department may have had a hand in that decision. No business likes getting tickled in the pocketbook.

A few years later I was discussing this with Chuck Olson of Olson Saw (now retired). He mused about the advertising claims, observing that steel in the blade has to get pretty hot before the molecular structure changes and damages the blade. Sawdust ignites at a much lower temperature.

I'm surprised some you-tuber hasn't done this type of test yet.

Ball bearing side guides emboss sawdust on the blade when cutting wet or resinous woods. This is not so much of an issue with the steel side guides.

Industrial saws have been using steel for a whole lot longer than I've been around.
 

gmakra

George
Senior User
Carter products make top notch band saw guide kits.
I have a set on my Laguna 18 inch saw couldnt be happier and they will last a lifetime.
 

marinosr

Richard
Senior User
A few years later I was discussing this with Chuck Olson of Olson Saw (now retired). He mused about the advertising claims, observing that steel in the blade has to get pretty hot before the molecular structure changes and damages the blade. Sawdust ignites at a much lower temperature.
(Mike, sorry for hijacking your thread.)

Interesting! So do y'all think that a blade losing it's temper from friction while sawing is just a myth? My thought is this: Rubbing against the guides would never heat the entire blade enough to lose its temper (and melt your tires in the process). But it would make the blade a less-effective heat sink to draw heat away from the only place it matters, the teeth. So if you're really working the teeth hard and riding against the guides (e.g. making a curved cut on a thick piece of hard wood, or excessive feed rate on a curved cut) the points of the teeth could lose their temper and then dull quite quickly. Whether this situation is actually encountered out in the wild, and whether the difference in heat generated from different guide types could matter, I don't know. Like you said, I'll leave that to some Youtube influencer to figure out :D
 

Our Sponsors

LATEST FOR SALE LISTINGS

Top