Ballerina #2 and a new foot design

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Shamrock

New User
Michael
Here's the 2nd Ballerina table I built-the 1st table I posted was actually the 2nd one built. (have I confused you yet:))Anyway, this was the 1st time I attempted the Louis cube top with veneer and it was really gappy (i.e. after I sprayed laquer on it the 1st time you could see divets - like a really open grained wood not grain filled) The problem with this was that the 1st coat I sprayed was tinted laquer. So I sanded it down, and tried a couple of different approaches to fill the gaps with my final result being I used bartop epoxy. This smoothed everything out, so I fiqured hey now I can spary color again. We'll laquer does not work over bar top epoxy (or at least it didn't for me) so back to the sanding then I applied some shellac THEN reapplied color. This time it worked, but unfortunatly the color on the top didn't quite match the bottom-which I sprayed months ago. In the end however, because of the shadow the top throws over the bottom you can't tell, especially indoors. Now put it outside in direct sunlight and we've got a problem. Alas, this is one of those personal 1st tries that look good but you keep around the house to remind yourself of mistakes not to make again.

On a side note, as I was making all these "ballerina" tables I experimented with the foot design a little and came up with a solid wood foot that gives that "en pointe" look even better than the holly and banded foot.

 

Charlie

Charlie
Corporate Member
Michael, Great looking table. I like both foot designs, but I'm partial to the holly and banded foot:gar-La;
 

Tarhead

Mark
Corporate Member
Very nice! I remember seeing the legs in the rough but forget if you had to do anything special with the grain. I know your table is very light but how did you manage it?
 

Shamrock

New User
Michael
Hey Mark-what do you mean by light, you mean in weight or appearance?

As far as the grain orientation on the foot. I try my best to have the grain running diagonal accross the leg when I lay it out on the lumber before cutting with the solid wood legs. As for the Holly legs I generally don't pay as much attention as the foot is doweled in the leg and with Holly being pretty grain neutral tends not to have the same grain splitting/vs angle of foot contact with the floor that regular wood has.
 

Tarhead

Mark
Corporate Member
Light as in not heavy enough to stress the legs. The photo looks kind of like you spliced a piece of wood with a different grain direction at the "knee" than above it but in reality it doesn't.
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mlzettl

Matt
Corporate Member
Mike,

I like the subtlety of the new foot design. It adds to the overall visual interest without any overstatement.

Matt
 
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