Antiquing

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dbvilla

New User
Dawn
Hi all,
Does anyone have any suggestions on antiquing? I think I would like to try this on a project. I have some ideas on giving the wood a distressed look. But I would love to make the wood much older.
Thanks,
Dawn (Bob)
 

DaveO

New User
DaveO
What kind of wood? Some woods like Cherry get darker with age, so giving them a sun-tan helps to speed up the process. For giving an old painted look, milk paint works well. I've seen wood distressed by beating it vith various shop objects like chains, screwdriver tips, ball-peen hammers etc. Another way to make something with old wood is to use old wood. The only problem with that is if you cut it you will expose non-weathered wood. I have read about chemicals that can be used to bring back the weathered gray look to fresh cut aged wood, but I can think of what they are at the moment. The last though, would be you could make projects like I do, by the time I finish them...the wood is old:lol: :lol: :lol:


Dave:)
 

dbvilla

New User
Dawn
Well Dave my thoughts are going back to the bed. (the trundle rope bed in the pic). I will most likely use mahogany or cherry.

By the way ... what is milk paint?
Dawn
 
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DaveO

New User
DaveO
Well, if you end up using cherry, give it a sun tan before finishing, and use some distressing techinques along with a rubbed satin oil finish and that will get you as close to the look of that bed in your picture

Milk paint is paint made with casein, which is milk protein. It was traditional use and is often seen in shaker pieces. Here is the best source for it and information about it:

http://www.milkpaint.com/

Dave:)
 

D L Ames

New User
D L Ames
Wow, those are couple more good links you guys posted, thanks.

Dawn, I have seen a couple articles and shows on distressing wood but have absolutely zero experience with it. I look forward to seeing how it turns out for you. Please post some pictures for us as you start the process so we can all learn from it.

D L
 

dbvilla

New User
Dawn
Well I have just spent a few hours with a friend of mine. He builds custom cabinets. You fellas would marvel at the neat stuff he has in his shop. Today he taught me about lumber. (As I guess you have figured out that I am a TRUE novice) I told him about the new project and wanted to see what he had in mahogany and cherry. He advised me that I have chosen the most difficult to finish and the most expensive (respectively). So I am going to have to rethink my wood. He suggested walnut. He said that it would finish dark, and was reasonably priced. (about the same as I paid for the wormy maple).
He also suggested that I could visit one of the many saw mills we have here in the county and buy my lumber, then air dry it for 6 months and then let him put it in his kiln. Which would save me some money in the future.

But I think the best advice I got today was how to make some guards for the "decapitating" Band Saw.

Thanks for the links fellas... I am having to do more planning with the bed than I was with the table.

Dawn
 
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M

McRabbet

Glad to here you got some good advice on making guards for the bandsaw -- we'd never recover if one of our angels (or are you a pixie?) got her wings clipped! Put that project on the front burner!

Rob
 

cskipper

Cathy
Corporate Member
Another affect you can use to "age" wood is to paint it and then sand it - more intensely on edges that would have worn over time, less on other places. I don't know if this works with staining, but I would think sanding a sealed finish would have the same affect.

I love Walnut. Check pricing, I know you can find it already kiln dried if you don't want to wait for the other process. Not sure of pricing.

Definietly fix the band saw.
 

Steve D

Member
Steve DeWeese
Dawn,
Maybe I'm shopping in the wrong places but I'm kind of suprised by the Walnut recommmendation to save money. Walnut, Cherry and Mahogany tend to run in very similar price categories. It is very common now for people to use Alder as a cost savings and finishes to make it look like other woods. The same is also true of Poplar but because of the green coloring it is more complicated to disguise it.
 

dbvilla

New User
Dawn
I am sorry that I didn't clarify myself. My friend is a cabinet maker. He was going to give me a deal on some walnut that he had there that was knotty in places. I happen to like knots. The people who hire him to do the cabinetry in their 2 million dollar "cottages" don't. So this was some lumber that he couldn't use in his business. So as they say "trash to some... treasure to others".
 
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