A One Week Project

Brian Patterson

Bstrom
User
Nothing to brag about - just another fairly quick little piece that comes from the benefit of doing multiple versions. A simple Black Walnut coffee table or bench, whatever you would wish to use it for.

Simple trestle construction with just a stretcher between the legs - no intermediate supports - the slab is lagged underneath through the stretcher. Base is solid Ash I bought that required squaring up, but was so full of ash borer holes that I chose to paint it after filling defects with Rock Hard. Loved the hole in the slab too much to plug it up - looks like a little canyon of sorts.

The finish is Waterlox on the Walnut - two brushed coats, sanded well with 320 and followed with two wipe-on coats including one put on with a 320 sheet to keep the surface clean and smooth. I’ve adopted this method as my default no-stain procedure. Will apply a generous Application of homemade Mineral Oil/Beeswax At the very end.

A topcoat of water based polyurethane will provide a longer wear protection and even out the paint appearance. I did this on an early piece and really like the practicality it brings.

All in all, I’m happy with it for the relatively short number of hours.
 

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sawman101

Bruce Swanson
Corporate Member
I love your creativity! That would work for so many applications, anywhere in the house. Nice work Brian!
 

JohnnyR

John
Corporate Member
Why include mineral oil on top of Waterlox? I assume the oil wouldn't soak through the finish and leave the wax suspended until the oil is rubbed off so why not just wax? Anyway, like your creation.
 

Brian Patterson

Bstrom
User
Why include mineral oil on top of Waterlox? I assume the oil wouldn't soak through the finish and leave the wax suspended until the oil is rubbed off so why not just wax? Anyway, like your creation.
Not just Mineral Oil - it’s a mix of that and Beeswax in a 4:1 ratio where you heat the oil and melt the wax in it. Let it cool into a soft waxy paste and you have a great cutting board treatment or all around furniture polish.
 

Oka

Oka
Corporate Member
Brian, I do kinda the same thing with the mineral oil, beeswax, but I also use Carnuba wax. I add 10% Carnuba to the Mineral oil and Beeswax, it makes the finish a little harder but goes on like slightly softened lard.

Nice work !
 

Brian Patterson

Bstrom
User
Brian, I do kinda the same thing with the mineral oil, beeswax, but I also use Carnuba wax. I add 10% Carnuba to the Mineral oil and Beeswax, it makes the finish a little harder but goes on like slightly softened lard.

Nice work !
Thanks for the suggestion. I’ll have to look for some Carnauba on eBay to add to my mix. It does need to be a bit tougher for furniture, Good as-is for cutting boards.
 

JohnnyR

John
Corporate Member
Not just Mineral Oil - it’s a mix of that and Beeswax in a 4:1 ratio where you heat the oil and melt the wax in it. Let it cool into a soft waxy paste and you have a great cutting board treatment or all around furniture polish.
I use a similar formula for cutting boards and have used it over Watco, both of which allow the oil to soak into the wood. With Waterlox underneath, which is impervious, don't you end up rubbing all the oil off and leaving less wax on the surface than if you only used wax? Not trying to be critical, just learning. It took me a lot of effort to rub out the mixture over Watco but it looked great.
 

Brian Patterson

Bstrom
User
I use a similar formula for cutting boards and have used it over Watco, both of which allow the oil to soak into the wood. With Waterlox underneath, which is impervious, don't you end up rubbing all the oil off and leaving less wax on the surface than if you only used wax? Not trying to be critical, just learning. It took me a lot of effort to rub out the mixture over Watco but it looked great.
You're probably right - would work on a simple Tung oil finish too, right? I may go with a plain lemon spray wax. Anything to give some slick!
 

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